Tag Archives: marketing strategies

4 steps to a social media strategy (infographic)

The fifth and final infographic I wanted to share this week is another on social media.

This deceptively simple visual gives a good overview of what marketers need to consider when putting together a social media strategy.  It’s a good attempt at removing some of the complexity that can creep in.

I also like the objectives, strategies and tactics approach that’s implicit here.

four-steps-to-a-social-media-strategy-infographic

Source:  Thanks to Marketing Profs for the share.

My infographic blog post series kicked off on Monday with The Social Sickness (social media personas) and Tuesday’s was Opinion Burnout (customer surveys).  On Wednesday there was The Evolution of Time Management Tools (self explainatory) and Thursday saw Common Phobias of Creatives (ditto).  I hope you’ve enjoyed them.

Simple difference between marketing objectives, strategy and tactics

graph showing revenue targetsApril is the new financial year for many of us and, if you’ve been too busy finishing up last financial year to plan for the next, here is a very short post about marketing planning.

All good marketing plans are based on the logical flow of marketing objectives from which marketing strategies are created and then the marketing tactics (activities) devised that will deliver these strategies and objectives.  All three link together.

So, what is an objective, strategy and tactic?  Here’s my very unashamedly simple explaination of the difference between the three:

  • objective – get to London
  • strategy – fly there
  • tactic – book my ticket

To put a marketing slant on this another example might be:

  • objective – achieve £1,000 of sales
  • strategy – sell 10% more of widget A to customer group 1 (Cumbrians)
  • tactic – attend event in Cumbria in June

When doing your marketing planning it can be very tempting to dive straight in to deciding what marketing activities you want to spend your time and money on in the coming year. 

However, to do this runs the risk of you being very busy and working very hard while not achieving what you set out to at the beginning of the year.

Never a good thing for a start up business.